Post-Operative Information

Care of the Mouth After Local Anesthetic

Your child has had local anesthetic for their dental procedure:

  • The tongue, teeth, lip and surrounding tissue will be numb or asleep if the procedure was performed in the upper and/or lower jaw(s).
  • Closely monitor your child for a couple hours following treatment because often times, they do not realize how chewing, scratching, sucking or playing with the numb tongue, lip or cheek can cause minor irritation to swelling and cuts.
  • We may recommend that your child be on a liquid or soft diet until the anesthetic has worn off.

Feel free to contact us if you have any questions or concerns.

Care of the Mouth After Trauma

  • Try to keep the traumatized area as clean as possible.
  • If you notice the traumatized tooth turning dark, contact us, as this could indicate a dying nerve.
  • Contact us as soon as possible if selling should occur so we can determine if an appointment is necessary. Apply ice during the first 24 hours to help reduce swelling.
  • If you notice infection (gum boils) in the traumatized area, contact us as soon as possible.
  • We recommend that your child be on a soft diet for up to three days, or until they feel comfortable to eat normally again.
  • Refrain from high-sugary foods and extremely cold or hot foods/beverages.
  • If given a prescription, please follow the directions on the bottle.

Please contact our office if you have any questions or concerns.

Care of the Mouth After Extractions

  • Closely monitor your child for a couple hours following treatment because often times, they do not realize how chewing, scratching, sucking or playing with the numb tongue, lip or cheek can cause minor irritation to swelling and cuts.
  • Refrain from spitting excessively.
  • Refrain from rinsing the mouth for several hours.
  • Refrain from drinking carbonated drinks until the day after the procedure.
  • Do not use a straw.
  • Avoid putting your finger and/or tongue in the extraction area.
  • Some bleeding is to be expected. If bleeding fails to subside, place a cotton gauze over the extraction area and bite down into place for 15 minutes. You can also use a tea bag to accomplish this.
  • We recommend that your child be on a soft diet for up to three days, or until they feel comfortable to eat normally again.
  • Refrain from strenuous activities for several hours after the extraction.
  • You may use Children’s Tylenol, Advil or Motrin to alleviate mild discomfort. If a medicine was prescribed, then follow the directions on the bottle. 

Please do not hesitate to call our office with any questions or concerns.

Care of Sealants

Sealants help to prevent tooth decay by forming a thin covering over the pits and fissures of the chewing surface of the teeth. It is important to maintain good oral hygiene and nutrition to assist in the prevention of decay, and to maintain the durability of your child’s sealants.

Your child should avoid eating ice or hard candy as this can cause the sealants to wear down faster. Generally, sealants will last 2-4 years.

Recognized by the American Dental Association, sealants play a vital role in the prevention of decay in your child’s teeth. Sealants have proven successful in protecting the chewing surfaces of your child’s teeth when placed properly and maintained well. This involved regular routine dental check-ups, daily brushing and flossing, the use of fluoride and limiting high-sugary foods and beverages. By following these guidelines, sealants can greatly reduce and even eliminate the risk of decay.

Oral Discomfort After a Cleaning

A thorough dental exam and cleaning may cause some bleeding and swelling that can lead to tenderness and discomfort. You can follow these at-home remedies to help alleviate this discomfort.

  • Use a warm salt water rinse 2-3 times a day.  (1 tsp. of salt mixed in 1 Cup of warm water.)
  • Use Children’s Tylenol, Advil or Motrin as directed for your child’s age.

Please call our office with any questions and/or concerns.